/Ocasio-Cortez on food assistance cuts: If this happened then, we mightve just starved | TheHill
Ocasio-Cortez on food assistance cuts: If this happened then, we mightve just starved | TheHill

Ocasio-Cortez on food assistance cuts: If this happened then, we mightve just starved | TheHill


Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez on food assistance cuts: ‘If this happened then, we might’ve just starved’ Youth climate activists grade top 2020 Democrats on Green New Deal commitment Sanders to join youth climate strikers in Iowa MORE (D-N.Y.) slammed the Trump administration’s decision to implement cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), referencing her family’s past reliance on food stamps.
“My family relied on food stamps (EBT) when my dad died at 48. I was a student. If this happened then, we might’ve just starved,” she tweeted Thursday. “Now many people will.”
She continued, criticizing Republican lawmakers who she views as stewards of the wealthy.
“It’s shameful how the GOP works overtime to create freebies for the rich while dissolving lifelines of those who need it most.”

My family relied on food stamps (EBT) when my dad died at 48.

I was a student. If this happened then, we might’ve just starved.

Now, many people will.

It’s shameful how the GOP works overtime to create freebies for the rich while dissolving lifelines of those who need it most. https://t.co/WOrYvhfPj4

— Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) December 5, 2019

The rebuke comes in response to a plan that would result in deep cuts to those who qualify to receive food stamps.
The Trump administration proposal, which was announced Wednesday, will stiffen the rules for states seeking waivers for a requirement that food stamp recipients be employed or enrolled in vocational training programs. Government estimates say the proposal could cut benefits for about 750,000 people.
The work or vocational training requirement applies to recipients who are “able-bodied” or are not caring for a child under 6 years old. Current guidelines say that states can grant a waiver for work requirements for those receiving benefits from SNAP, also known as food stamps, if their unemployment rates are at least 20 percent above the national rate.
The proposal would limit benefits for an estimated 3.7 million people and 2.1 million households.
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