/Acceptance of same-sex relationship fall for first time in decades
Acceptance of same-sex relationship fall for first time in decades

Acceptance of same-sex relationship fall for first time in decades


Britain’s liberalism towards same-sex relationships has declined for the first time in nearly 40 years, with experts suggesting levels of tolerance may have peaked.
In 1983 in the UK eight out of 10 people said homosexual relationships were wrong at a time when leaflets about HIV and AIDS were posted through people’s doors warning: ‘Don’t die of ignorance’.
But acceptance of lesbian, gay and bisexual Britons has steadily risen, reaching 68 per cent in 2017. Last year, however, that figure dropped to 66 per cent for the first time.
The British Social Attitudes survey claims religion could be to blame, citing a ‘marked divide between the attitudes of religious and non-religious people’.

A graphics shows a 'plateau' in liberal attitudes towards same-sex relationships

A graphics shows a ‘plateau’ in liberal attitudes towards same-sex relationships

The British Social Attitudes survey has shown liberal attitudes towards same-sex relationships have declined for the first time since the AIDS crisis. Pictured: Pride in London 2019

The British Social Attitudes survey has shown liberal attitudes towards same-sex relationships have declined for the first time since the AIDS crisis. Pictured: Pride in London 2019

The study, which quizzes 4,000 people and is backed by the government, found there are more people who believe in non-Christian faiths such as Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism and Judaism than previously.
It also revealed fewer people are accepting of sex before marriage than they used to be and there is still ‘some way to go’ on Britain’s views of the transgender community.

Fears over scale of poverty rise as rise with Labour voters feeling levels worse than Tories

Fears over the scale of poverty in Britain have risen over the past decade across the political divide.

But, the report said, inequality levels are in reality similar to those in 2008 when the financial downturn struck.

Nearly three-quarters of Labour backers and more than half of Tories thought there was a lot of poverty in 2018.

This was up 28 points for Labour supporters and five points for Tories over the decade.

There was also a class divide with more better-off people thinking poverty levels had risen.

While more than four out of five people had no prejudice against gender transition, fewer than half said prejudice against transgender people was always wrong.
Experts claim it is still religion that creates a divide when it comes to premarital sex, with 93 per cent of non-believers having no objection.
On the other hand, only 66 per cent of Christians and 35 per cent of those subscribing to non-Christian faiths thought likewise.
‘Such clear religious divides in attitudes to premarital sex are likely to reflect the importance many religions place upon the sanctity of marriage,’ it said.
‘Those cohabiting with a partners and who are separated or divorced are most likely to think that premarital sex is not wrong at all.’
Researchers said that while tolerant attitudes to sex may have ‘reached a point of plateau’, where acceptance of those not fitting within conventional norms appears to have levelled off.
But they said there was ‘some way to go’ on transgender matters and they expected opinion to liberalise in future years.

In 1983 in the UK eight out of 10 people said homosexual relationships were wrong at a time when leaflets about HIV and AIDS were posted through people's doors warning: 'Don't die of ignorance'

In 1983 in the UK eight out of 10 people said homosexual relationships were wrong at a time when leaflets about HIV and AIDS were posted through people’s doors warning: ‘Don’t die of ignorance’

Gay rights activist Peter Tatchell (pictured at Pride) claims the figures reveal a 'worrying trend'

Gay rights activist Peter Tatchell (pictured at Pride) claims the figures reveal a ‘worrying trend’

In 1983, when British Social Attitudes began measuring religious identity, two-thirds of the British public identified as Christian. This figure now stands at just over one third (38%)

In 1983, when British Social Attitudes began measuring religious identity, two-thirds of the British public identified as Christian. This figure now stands at just over one third (38%)

In 1993, just under half (46%) of people agreed that “we believe too often in science, and not enough in feelings and faith” while now just a quarter (27%) agree

In 1993, just under half (46%) of people agreed that ‘we believe too often in science, and not enough in feelings and faith’ while now just a quarter (27%) agree

Attitudes to gender roles have changed significantly since the 1980s, with three-quarters of the public rejecting the idea that women should be homemakers while men are breadwinners

Attitudes to gender roles have changed significantly since the 1980s, with three-quarters of the public rejecting the idea that women should be homemakers while men are breadwinners

Gay rights activist Peter Tatchell told The Guardian the figures revealed a ‘worrying trend’ in UK attitudes to the LGBT community.

God losing battle to science with more than half UK having ‘no religion’

Britons are more likely to believe in scientists than God, according to the report.

It found that 52 per cent said they have no religion and 21 per cent have no confidence in churches.

Only one in 100 young adults between 18 and 24 regarded themselves as members of the Church of England.

But the number who mistrusted scientists has nearly halved since the 1990s and 85 per cent said they have trust in university scientists.

Meanwhile 16 per cent said they had no confidence in a Parliament mired in Brexit.

But the Christian Institute charity insisted that sex should be between a man and woman in the context of marriage.
They told the newspaper they were concerned about a ‘new orthodoxy that not to celebrate same-sex relations is homophobic’.
Recent clashes between the Muslim community and those supporting LGBT-inclusive sex education lessons in schools point to increased defiance of social liberalism among religious groups in the UK.
The ‘No Outsiders’ programme devised by Birmingham teacher Andrew Moffat has been hugely divisive in the West Midlands, where there is a large Muslim population.
Police were drafted in to calm tensions between Muslim parents, some of whom claim the lessons are ‘brainwashing their children to be gay’, and teachers.
They argue that teaching children as young as four and five about same-sex relationships is not consistent with Islam.
Politicians have weighed in on the debate on both sides, with local Labour MP Jess Phillips defending the inclusive curriculum, while Tories Esther McVey and Andrea Leadsom expressing their support of the parents’ rights to object.

It is clear that faith influences how many people respond to the ethics of pre-birth testing - which the study says s to be expected given the relationship between this and abortion

It is clear that faith influences how many people respond to the ethics of pre-birth testing – which the study says s to be expected given the relationship between this and abortion

Recent clashes between the Muslim community and those supporting LGBT-inclusive sex education lessons in schools point to increased defiance of social liberalism among religious groups in the UK. Pictured: Protesters outside Parkfield Community School, Birmingham

Recent clashes between the Muslim community and those supporting LGBT-inclusive sex education lessons in schools point to increased defiance of social liberalism among religious groups in the UK. Pictured: Protesters outside Parkfield Community School, Birmingham

Newly-elected Brexit Party MEP Ann Widdecombe caused outrage when she said there would one be a 'scientific answer' to being gay

Newly-elected Brexit Party MEP Ann Widdecombe caused outrage when she said there would one be a ‘scientific answer’ to being gay

Jacob Rees-Mogg (pictured) , opposes same-sex relationships on 'religious grounds'

Jacob Rees-Mogg (pictured) , opposes same-sex relationships on ‘religious grounds’

A third graphic shows greater levels of prejudice against the transgender community among the elderly in Britain

A third graphic shows greater levels of prejudice against the transgender community among the elderly in Britain

Newly-elected Brexit Party MEP Ann Widdecombe caused outrage when she said there would one be a ‘scientific answer’ to being gay.

More than half of Britons feel mothers should do most of the childcare for new baby

Most adults resisted the idea that new mothers should leave their baby and go out to work to pursue their career.

The survey found that 51 per cent believed mothers should do most of the childcare for a new baby and that nearly one in five think mothers should stay at home while fathers work.

There was also scepticism over the importance of the gender pay gap. Only 48 per cent of women said this was wrong in organisations where men held mainly senior jobs and women mainly junior jobs.

Among graduates, only a third thought a pay gap was wrong in such a company.

Nancy Kelley, of the National Centre For Social Research, said: ‘It is clear that practical barriers and cultural norms about women’s place in the home and at work persist.

‘We are still more likely to feel that mothers should be at home with young children.  While pay equality is seen as wrong, the public has far more mixed views about the gender pay gap.’

Other politicians have sparked controversy by expressing their conservative views on same-sex relationships, including Jacob Rees-Mogg, who opposes them on ‘religious grounds’.
MPs voted to extend gay marriage rights to couples in Northern Ireland this week, but that could be revoked if a new Northern Ireland Assembly is established and they disagree.
Homosexuality was legalised in Northern Ireland in 1982, 15 years after the rest of the UK.
Elsewhere in the BSA survey, it shows the British public is not as worried about climate change as its political leaders.
It also reveals 51 per cent of people believe mothers should stay at home and do the majority of childcare duties.
Views on Brexit are divided along the lines of age and levels of education, the poll claims.
Nancy Kelley of the National Centre for Social Research which carried out the survey, said: ‘In 1983, people would have been happy to say they are not comfortable with same-sex relations. Obviously, attitudes have changed quite a lot since then.
I think it is reasonable to assume that we will see that same liberalisation as we saw in attitudes to gay and lesbian people with the trans community as the public becomes more accustomed to it.’
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